A visit to Lobkowicz Palace

One of the two highlights of my recent trip to Prague, the Czech Republic, was definitely the Lobkowicz Palace inside the Prague Castle complex. The palace is the only privately owned part of the castle and is one of many residences that members of the Lobkowicz family has managed to get back from the state. And at Lobkowicz Palace they certainly have done the most of it!

Lobkowicz Palace

In the most wonderful audio guide I have ever listened to, Prince William Lobkowicz, occasionally joined by other family members, takes visitors on a personal tour of the palace as well as the family’s history.
– Probably the most remarkable thing, certainly in the past 100 years, is that we’ve lost everything twice, and gotten it back twice, William says at the beginning of the tour when one has climbed the stairs to begin a wander through a suite of rooms. What a way to start, I thought! The audio guide goes on to present both the items you view as well as the family’s history in an excellent way, nicely paired with some background music from composers of the time.

– Even after 50 years of exile, I have vivid memories of riding my bike down the long galleries of Roudnice Castle, feeling the weight of my disapproving ancestors looking down on me, Prince William’s father Prince Martin tells visitors in front of a painting of the castle. In 1939 Prince Martin fled the Nazi occupation with his family, leaving behind the family’s thirteen castles and a large collection of art and other objects.

In 1945 the Lobkowicz family could return to a liberated country and reclaim their property but only three years later, in 1948, they had to flee the communists who seized everything once again. The Lobkowicz family couldn’t return until after the Velvet Revolution in 1989 and the restitution of some of their properties and collections has been a process going into the 21st century.

The collection at Lobkowicz Palace is beautifully presented both in the way the exhibitions are made and how the audio guide gives a personal presentation of many items. There is a very impressive collection of family portraits, paintings, porcelain, armoury, religious items, dog portraits and musical instruments and scores. For lovers of classical music it’s a real treat to see original instruments and scores by Beethoven (who left personal dedications to Lobkowicz family members), Mozart (including his re-orchestrated version of Händel’s Messiah), Haydn and Guck.

One instantly recognizable piece at the Lobkowicz Palace after last year’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom was “The River Thames with St. Paul’s Cathedral on Lord Mayor’s Day” by Antonio Canaletto. The painting, of circa 1750, was on loan to the exhibition “Royal River: Power, Pageantry and the Thames” at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich for a good part of 2012 and featured in many reviews and articles about the Thames Diamond Jubilee flotilla. Also this painting, which is the second of two in a series, has an interesting story of how it came into the Lobkowicz family – but I’ll let you visit the palace to hear about that (I don’t want to spoil all the gems of the audio tour!).

Prepare to spend quite a good amount of time at the palace and when you’re done what better place to sit down and relax than the palace’s café, featuring beautiful views down over Prague? The establishment has a small but good menu, the food is of good quality and taste as far as I could tell. My travelling companion and I both tried the carrot cake from a family recipe and it was excellent.

I ended up spending quite a long time at Lobkowicz Palace and when I left there was only one thing itching me – why is there not a good English or bi-lingual book about the family? I asked in the palace shop if they knew of any books about the family being published but to no avail. With such a rich and fascinating history as well as some very charismatic family members who are good at telling stories, a good comprehensive book about the Lobkowicz family and their properties and collections is long overdue.

Lobkowicz Palace café's terrace

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